Thursday, June 18, 2015

UPDATED: 50 Links to Summer PD

There are so many educational opportunities for teachers during the summer months. Some can be offered for free, and other charge fees. I'm going to mix it up a bit, because I know there are school districts which will reimburse their teachers if there is a fee. In my case, I'm on my own if I decide to pay for any workshops or classes this summer. The free ones that I know about are marked with an *.
NOTE: Some events could not be listed because the date to apply has already passed.





JUST FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIANS

ALA Las Vegas- American Association of School Librarians schedule HERE

*EasyBib Professional Development- on demand and free

English Language Learners and the School Library- July 20-22; Cambridge, MA


*Gale Geek Webinars- play or download

*Junior Library Guild On-Site or Online Training for Librarians

Picture Book Conference- at the Mazza Museum, University of Findlay, Ohio

*Professional Development/Webinars- currently about 28 on the list with updates all the time

*School Librarian Twitter Chats as Professional Development

*Summer Teen- School Library Journal's online event covering teen issues and their affect on your teen collection.



ALL EDUCATORS

Annenberg Learner- view videos in these subject areas: arts, foreign language, literature and language arts, math, science, social studies and history

Arkansas STEM Coalition- computer science professional development


ASCD Summer Professional Development Opportunities- all over the U.S.

Center for STEM Education for Girls- locations for professional development all over the U.S.

Coursera-  verified certificates for certain courses ($); others are FREE


DIY Professional Development Resource Roundup- from Edutopia 

*edCamp- list of all edCamp schedules (it's worldwide!)


EdTech Teacher Summer Workshops- Atlanta, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco Bay Area and Chicago

*edWeb Webinars


*Free Professional Learning Through ASCD's Professional Development Tools- includes webinars, virtual learning, book study guides


The Art of Education Conference- for art teachers; national online conference


The Conference Calendar- lists conferences for all types of educators


Connecticut Council of Language Teachers- July 9-10


The Education Cooperative- long list of PD opportunities either online or Tec Learning Center in Massachusetts


Education Week Teacher PD Directory- extensive listing of professional development opportunities


Houghton Mifflin Professional Development- for math teachers

ISTE 2015 Philadelphia- June 28- July 1


*The Library of Congress- FREE PD for teachers


*Maker Educator Boot Camp- held in Pittsburgh, PA


Museum Institute for Teaching Science- summer professional development institutes; located in different parts of Massachusetts.

Music-Comp- professional development for music teachers; located in Burlington, VT; begins July13th and 20th.

*National Archives- PD Webinars for Educators


The New Victory Theater- (NYC, August 10-14) "Workshops designed to help classroom teachers and arts specialists (Pre-K to 12th grade) cultivate the skills to incorporate the performing arts into their lesson planning and teaching practice."


NEA Member Benefits: Professional Development

NJEA Professional Learning


NJEA Summer Learning Opportunities

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection- science educators

Professional Development Programs for Teachers- from The Newberry, Chicago's Independent Research Library

Professional Learning at the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum- (NYC) August 3-8; some $$

Richard Byrne's Online PD Opportunities-learn from one of the best!


Smithsonian Educator Workshops- includes the Mobile Learning Institute; many wait list only


Solution Tree Institutes- many sold out, so hurry

Stanford Summer Teaching Institute- language arts, technology, science, math

*Summer Rejuvination Guide- from Edutopia

Summer Programs from LRC- for foreign language teachers

Teachers College, Columbia University- conferences on various topics; some are wait-list only

Teq Summer PD- NYC and Long Island


University of British Columbia Online Courses

University of North Dakota Professional Development- in person or online

University of Wisconsin Stout-  34 online professional development courses





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Monday, June 15, 2015

The 12 Most Popular Posts This School Year




I can't believe it is that time of the year already! Some of you have already ended your school year and others are following a totally different schedule with year-round classes. In case you missed them, here are the top 12 posts from September 2014-June 2015. Have a wonderful summer, whatever you do!






23 Chrome Extensions You Must Have

31 Free iPad Apps for Science Teachers

43 Free iPad Apps for Geography, History, Civics & Social Studies Teachers

All About Google Classroom in 22 Clicks!

Amazing! 74 Infographics for Teacher-Librarians (L.A. Teachers Too!)

Cartoons Only a Teacher Would Love

Free Online PD Infographic - from Joyce Valenza

Google Apps Status Dashboard Lets You Know What's Up

Great Video to Show Your Students What a Terrific Resource You Are

Hats Off to Google's Dan Russell!

Kids Love Scavenger Hunts! Here are 57 Sites to Get You Started!

PowerPoint Presentations Need a Boost? Here's Some Great Advice


This is my dream summer vacation!

Friday, June 12, 2015

Calling All Guest Bloggers


With summer right around the corner, it's time for me to once again offer all educators the opportunity to do a guest blog post right here on A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet. No matter what your discipline is, you are welcome to fill out the form below. If you are chosen, I will email you with all the info needed to share your post. We begin on July 1, 2015!







Thursday, June 4, 2015

Tips for End-of-the-Year Library Obligations

Oh, it's that time again.  Time to collect the late books.  Time to chase after students for overdue fines. Time to assess everything that went on this year in the school library.

I'm not a fan of being the bad guy, but one has to be in order to teach our students about being responsible. I haven't been as successful as I would like, but I have always managed to clear my list by the end of the school year. (Personally, I would LOVE not to have to charge fines, but with budget issues as they are, our library needs the money.)

Here's the catch about teaching responsibility: If a student loses a book, their parent pays for it. If a student has a late fee, their parent pays for it. It's been suggested that a proper payback would be for the student to work off their debt. I don't agree. There are many ways to solve this dilemma. (Of course there are very special situations, like if there are serious problems occurring in the student's family i.e. illness, divorce. Use your discretion. )

Here are some tips on how to collect fines and overdue books:

1. Maintain a sense of humor. Losing your grip will only stress you out. It is not worth it. What's the name of the book series?  Don't Sweat the Small Stuff. Perhaps your signs could take on a message which is delivered using humor? Here are two I created; one uses humor and the other one is very basic and to the point:


I found these funny signs on the Internet.  Not sure I'd use some of them, but they ARE funny.
  
Here is a sign which is too plain and will not get your students' attention:

2. Be tenacious. I follow students to their classrooms and I keep showing up day after day until they either return a book or settle their fine. When they see you are not going away, they remember. It has worked for me just about every time.

3. Offer an incentive.
    Here's a cute take on the Monopoly card from the Hastings-on-Hudson Public Library:


You could also try Food for Fines, where instead of cash, the student brings in cans of non-perishable food which can be donated to a local food bank.

Amnesty Coupons are also a good way to get students to settle their debt. Choose one day and see what happens.


Remember the show Deal or No Deal?  (Repeats of the show are currently on GSN) I found this idea in the Google book Tips and Other Bright Ideas for Secondary School Libraries, Volume 4   by Kate Vande Brake :



4. Use operant conditioning.
     Students need to understand that their behavior has a consequence. I have used class trips and the prom as an incentive for the collection of books. (See my poster Do You Owe Us a Book or Fine?above which explains.)

5. When all else fails, call the parent. Sometimes it is difficult to get in touch, but be persistent. The chance is pretty good that the parent did not know that their child had an overdue book or fine.

DO YOU HAVE A SPECIAL THING YOU DO TO GET BOOKS & FINES FROM STUDENTS?
Please comment at the bottom of the post.

Now to de-stress. Here are some really funny cartoons about overdue books:

 

 


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Sunday, May 17, 2015

UPDATED: 50 Jobs for Kids Ages 12-17




This is an updated list (12 more added from last year) of jobs for kids between the ages of 12-17. With a little creativity (and a bit of that entrepreneurial spirit) there are many things your students can do to earn extra money.








1. Advertise on Fiverr (http://www.fiverr.com/ ) where someone could pay $5.00 and up for a service of yours

2. Assist a senior citizen with their chores at home or away from home

3. Babysit

4. Be a clown, magician or other entertainment at a kid’s birthday party

5. Bicycle repair

6. Camp counselor or counselor in training at a day camp or sleep away camp

7. Collect aluminum cans for $$

8. Create anime or cartoon books to sell

9. Distribute advertising flyers on car windshields

10. Dog walker

11. Dog washer

12. Fix computer problems

13. Golf Caddy

14. Have a bake sale

15. House cleaning

16. Iced tea stand

16. Lifeguard

17. Lemonade stand

18. Messenger service

19. Modeling

20. Mow lawns/raking leaves

21. Music teacher

22. Newspaper delivery

23. Office help: filing, sorting, organizing

24. Paint faces at a craft market street fair

25. Pet sitting

26.  Photograph a kid’s birthday party

27. Plant flowers

28. Plant sit

29. Put flyers on cars

30. Restore old photos

31. Run errands for people

32. Shovel snow (this is not just a summer list)

33. Sell bottles water at a Little League game, race or marathon

34. Sell hand-made stuff on Etsy (https://www.etsy.com/)

35. Sell stuff on eBay

36. Smartphone/Tablet Tutor

37. Start an online business: Bizinate (bizinate.com/kids)

38. Stuff envelopes for a company or person

39. Take an online survey and getting paid cash (http://www.cashcrate.com/ )

40. Translate documents etc. (You must be fluent in that language)

41. Tutor young kids

42. TV Remote Control Programmer (for people who need a tech savvy person)

43. Videographer: example: record people practicing golf swings

44. Volunteer at the public library

45. Volunteer for charity work (animal shelter etc.)

46. Wash cars

47. Wash windows

48. Work as an usher at a movie theater

49. Work for a church or other group as a pianist

50. Write an article for Ezine  (http://ezinearticles.com/

Friday, May 15, 2015

Google Drops Reading Level Search Filter

Every time I design a Google tutorial and print as a poster, Google either changes the method or drops another tool. This time it was the search filter "reading level". The way I understand it, Google noticed that this tool was not being used a lot, so that was the reason for dropping it. I believe I know why it wasn't being utilized; most people didn't even know that it was there. When I showed my special education and ESL classes "reading level", they were so happy to have found a way to filter only those sites/articles they could understand. Why not make these tools easier to find?  The average adult (my students as well) is not even aware of how the search tools work in images. Here's a screenshot of what search tools can do in an image search:


Google needs to remember that the average joes in the world are not as tech savvy as the geeks out there. I hope that they would rethink putting back the "reading level" filter under Google search tools. Please?

Friday, April 17, 2015

Two Song Parodies to Promote Reading

Just in case you are not aware....it is National Library Week. I came across these two awesome videos which are parodies Bruno Mars' Uptown Funk (Unread Book) and Taylor Swift's Shake it Up.(CheckItOut) Feel free to share and of course to dance!!



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